Posts Tagged ‘robertscoble’

FriendFeed and Twitter ROI for Robert Scoble?

Social Media by Flickr user Thomas HawkMichael Arrington over at TechCrunch thinks Robert Scoble needs a FriendFeed intervention. Michael believes Scoble’s reputation as a "blogger" is suffering because he’s spending too much time on FriendFeed and Twitter and not enough time on his blog. On Twitter Robert has nearly 45,000 followers and has written over 16,000 messages. On Friendfeed Robert has nearly 23,000 subscribers.

Scoble responds to the attempted intervention on his blog and on FriendFeed.

What do I think? I applaud Scoble for risking his reputation as a blogger to put the wider social network and micro-blogging to the test. I think Scoble has increased his influence in 2008 by establishing himself (and his brand) on FriendFeed and Twitter. I don’t think it will take much effort on his part to get his Web 1.0 blog numbers back up again – if that’s what he wants to do. I think Arrington is probably jealous that Scoble (essentially a one man shop) has him beat on the FriendFeed and Twitter metrics. Arrington is probably looking at 2009 wondering how he can catch up ; )

Keep up the good work Robert! I think your investment in FriendFeed and Twitter will pay off.


Friendverse Weakens

Friendverse

There’s a rift forming in your Friendverse and you need to close it before it destroys the social fabric that holds your Friendverse together. The Friendverse is the invisible bond that connects you with your friends – the people you really know, like, and trust.

friend n. – A person whom one knows, likes, and trusts.

Yesterday, I was part of a blog conversation about the need for a standard that makes "Friend" lists more portable. Moving from one social network to another, Twitter to Pownce for example, can be a frustrating experience because you have to re-build your "Friend" list every time you move. Wouldn’t it be nice if you could take your "Friend" list with you when you move to, or start ,a new social network? The experience is especially frustrating for the socialites that have thousands of supposed friends – people like Robert Scoble who boast "Friend" lists numbering in the thousands. Yes, a standard that makes these lists more portable would be nice but maybe we should be looking at the way we’re "Friending" before we start developing a system to support meaningless "Friend" lists.

I’ve received multiple "Friend" requests from Twitter users that have "Friend" lists numbering in the thousands. The same thing happens to me on Facebook. I completely ignore most of these requests because I don’t like the idea of "Friending" people I don’t know, like, or trust. I should be able to invite a "Friend" over for dinner. A "Friend" would come to my funeral. Don’t you want to know someone, at least a little, before you add them to your "Friend" list? I guarantee you this, Robert Scoble has people on his "Friend" lists that he wouldn’t associate with in the real world.

I believe my Friendverse should be based on real relationships, a true reflection of my real world social network. I think people with "Friend" lists numbering in the thousands aren’t respecting their Friendverse. Not respecting your Friendverse, letting that rift form, can have real world consequences. Your real world friends, that crucial support network, will weaken as your expanding and meaningless "Friend" lists consume your time, weakening your social network. Your real world friends will begin to question their value in your social network as they become one of thousands that call you a "Friend." If you have thousands of "Friends," what does that make them? A "special" friend, a "best" friend, a "real" friend? If you don’t give your Friendverse the respect it deserves you’ll end up with a very weak social network and few real world friends.

So perhaps we should stop looking for ways to expand and transport meaningless "Friend" lists and instead focus on building a meaningful and rich Friendverse. People we like, know, and trust.


Scoble Style

My friend Pat McCarthy did a fantastic job outlining a talk Robert Scoble and Maryam Scoble gave recently at the Blog Business Summit titled Fifteen Ways to a Killer Blog. This isn’t exactly new but I thought it was worth passing on.


Scoble – IMO

Scoble, the uber blogger, is leaving Microsoft for Silicon Valley start-up podtech.com. News of Scoble’s decision to leave Microsoft rocked the blogosphere over the weekend and it will continue to monopolize the conversation through the week. In fact, the jolt and the resulting traffic was significant enough to knock podtech.com off-line for a while. IMO, Microsoft should have done a lot more (there’s a price) to keep him around. Seriously, Scoble is Microsoft in the blogosphere and I can’t see how they’re going to fill the void – Channel9 was just a small part of what he did for them. Big mistake Microsoft – you can’t afford to loose guys like Robert. Best wishes Robert!

Related: Scoble is Leaving Microsoft – Chris Pirillo (good "buzz" outline/link list

 


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palmIT is authored by Cale Bruckner [LinkedIn], President at Concentric Sky, and former SVP Product Development at Palo Alto Software.

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